Law-Related Courses Offered by Other Departments Spring 2018

***Always check the Campus Solutions Schedule of Classes for the latest most up-to-date info.***

NOTE:  Areas listed are for the NEW PLAN only.

Chicano Studies 174 Chicanos Law & Criminal Justice (4)  An examination of the development and function of law, the organization and administration of criminal justice, and their effects in the Chicano community; response to these institutions by Chicanos. (Area I or II)

ESPM 163 AC Environmental Justice: Race, Class, Equity & the Environment (4) Overview of the field of environmental justice, analyzing the implications of race, class, labor, and equity on environmental degradation and regulation. Environmental justice movements and struggles within poor and people of color communities in theU.S., including: African Americans, Latino Americans, and Native American Indians. Frameworks and methods for analyzing race, class, and labor. Cases of environmental injustice, community and government responses, and future strategies for achieving environmental and labor justice. (Area II or IV)

UGBA 107 Social & Political Environment of Business (3) Study and analysis of American business in a changing social and political environment. Interaction between business and other institutions. Role of business in the development of social values, goals, and national priorities. The expanding role of the corporation in dealing with social problems and issues. (Area III)

Media Studies 104A Freedom of Speech and the Press (3) The course considers the philosophical and historical underpinnings of the First Amendment guarantee of press freedom, with particular emphasis on the practical implications of major Supreme Court decisions. The focus is on the contemporary legal rights and obligations of the print and broadcast media with regard to libel, privacy, prior restraint, fair trial/free press, newsgathering, and access to information. (Area IV)

Political Sci 112B History of Political Theory (4) Early modern political thought up to the French Revolution, including Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. (Area V)

Political Sci 124C Ethics of Justice in Intl. Affairs (4) Should nations intervene in other countries to prevent human rights abuses or famine? On what principles should immigration be based? Should wealthy states aid poorer states, and if so, how much? Who should pay for global environmental damage? Answers to these moral questions depend to a great degree on who we believe we have an obligation to: Ourselves? Nationals of our country? Residents of our country? Everyone in the world equally? We will examine different traditions of moral thought including skeptics, communitarians, cosmopolitans, and use these traditions as tools to make reasoned judgments about difficult moral problems in world politics. (Area V)

Political Sci 157A Constitutional Law of the U.S. (4) Fundamental principles of constitutional law, leading cases, causes, and consequences of legal decisions and their role in influencing, shaping, and constraining the American political system. A. Judicial Review and the Limits to National Power. B. Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. (Area IV or V)

Public Policy C103 Wealth & Poverty (4)This course is designed to provide students with a deeper understanding both of the organization of the political economy in the United States and of other advanced economies, and of why the distribution of earnings, wealth, and opportunity have been diverging in the United States and in other nations. It also is intended to provide insights into the political and public-policy debates that have arisen in light of this divergence, as well as possible means of reversing it. (Area I or IV)

Sociology 137AC Environmental Justice, Race, Class, Equity, & the Environment (formerly 128AC) (4) (cross-listed w/ESPM 163AC) Overview of the field of environmental justice, analyzing the implications of race, class, labor, and equity on environmental degradation and regulation. Environmental justice movements and struggles within poor and people of color communities in theU.S., including: African Americans, Latino Americans, and Native American Indians. Frameworks and methods for analyzing race, class, and labor. Cases of environmental injustice, community and government responses, and future strategies for achieving environmental and labor justice. (Area II or IV)

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