Law-Related Courses from Other Departments Fall 2021

NOTE:  Areas listed are for the NEW PLAN only.

AAS 141 Law in Asian American Community (4) Course will examine the nature, structure, and operation of selected legal institutions as they affect Asian American communities and will attempt to analyze the roles and effects of law, class, and race in American society.  (Area II or IV)

UGBA 107 Social & Political Environment of Business (3) Study and analysis of American business in a changing social and political environment. Interaction between business and other institutions. Role of business in the development of social values, goals, and national priorities. The expanding role of the corporation in dealing with social problems and issues. (Area III)

UGBA 175 Legal Aspects of Management (3) An analysis of the law and the legal process, emphasizing the nature and functions of law within the U.S. federal system, followed by a discussion of the legal problems pertaining to contracts and related topics, business association, and the impact of law on economic enterprise. (Area III)

ESPM 163 AC Environmental Justice: Race, Class, Equity & the Environment (4) Overview of the field of environmental justice, analyzing the implications of race, class, labor, and equity on environmental degradation and regulation. Environmental justice movements and struggles within poor and people of color communities in theU.S., including: African Americans, Latino Americans, and Native American Indians. Frameworks and methods for analyzing race, class, and labor. Cases of environmental injustice, community and government responses, and future strategies for achieving environmental and labor justice. (Area II or IV)

Ethnic Studies 190 AC sec 001: Inside and Beyond Walls: Migra, Masses and the Carceral State
The course has three main avenues of exploration. First, we seek to understand the political historical structural and social roots of racialized mass incarceration and racialized mass detention and deportation. Second, we examine the work of practitioners, scholars and activists developing critical analyses and abolitionist strategies for social change through their analytical connections between seemingly disconnected forms of state violence. Lastly, whilst the effects of mass incarceration can be quantified to some extent, and those numbers are often the bi-line for many studies, the damages wrought by these realities are only now being excavated. In the race to incarcerate and detain/deport what does it mean to live in a community where three out of every ten boys growing up will spend time in prison, what does it do to the fabric of a family to have parents suspended in deportation hearings, and what does it mean to a community’s political influence when one quarter of black men in some states cannot vote because of a felony conviction? We seek to integrate the work of both the student’s own story and those directly affected by mass incarceration, detention and deportation. In so doing we will also analyze the organizing of Bay Area and state community organizations such as the Transgender and Intersex Justice Project (TGIJP); All of Us Or None; The UC Black Workers Organizing Project; 67 Suenos; Oakland UNITE and Critical Resistance.  (Area I)

Global 173 International Human Rights (4) (formerly known as PACS 126) International Human Rights (4)
This course will explore the philosophical evolution of human rights principles in the realm of political theory and the influence of such principles as they have transformed into a coherent body of law. We will focus specifically on issues in international human rights law; the approach will be both thematic and comparative. Topics will include but are not limited to: human rights diplomacy; the influence of human rights in international legal practice; cultural and minority rights; genocide and the world community; cultural relativism and national sovereignty; international law and international relations; individual and collective rights; migration, labor, and globalization; and national, international, and nongovernmental organizations. (Area IV or V)

Media Studies 104D Privacy in the Digital Age (3) (Area I or IV)
This course examines issues of privacy in contemporary society, with an emphasis on how privacy is affected by technological change. Modern privacy is informed by a patchwork of overlapping constitutional rights, statutory laws, regulations, market forces and social norms. Thus, although the U.S. Constitution does not contain the word “privacy,” the concept remains an important part of our legal and cultural experience. After an introduction to features of the American legal system and the theoretical underpinnings of privacy law, we will consider privacy in the context of law enforcement investigations (including what it takes for the government to track your movements or read your email), national security (such as when the government can get a secret foreign intelligence wiretap), government records and databases (including how to get access to them), newsgathering torts, protections for journalistic work product, First Amendment limitations on privacy regulation, and international perspectives.

NATAMST 102  Critical Native American Legal and Policy Studies. (4)   Key contemporary issues in the critical study of tribal and federal policy pertaining to American Indians and Alaska Natives in the U.S. Topics include political and cultural sovereignty; religious, gendered, sexual, racial, and other tribal minorities, and civil rights within tribes; Native legal identity and tribal enrollment; the role of violence against women in the history of colonialism, and the struggle for justice and healing; and the movement for traditional or other culturally appropriate forms for tribal self-governance. (Area IV or V)

Philosophy 104 Ethical Theories (4) The fundamental concepts and problems of morality examined through the study of classical and contemporary philosophical theories of ethics. (Area II or V)

Philosophy 115 Political Philosophy (4) This course is devoted to some of the central questions in contemporary political philosophy: liberty, justice and equality. The course is focused particularly on the work of John Rawls. (Area V)

Political Sci 112B History of Political Theory (4) Early modern political thought up to the French Revolution, including Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. (Area V)

Political Sci 124C Ethics of Justice in Intl. Affairs (4) Should nations intervene in other countries to prevent human rights abuses or famine? On what principles should immigration be based? Should wealthy states aid poorer states, and if so, how much? Who should pay for global environmental damage? Answers to these moral questions depend to a great degree on who we believe we have an obligation to: Ourselves? Nationals of our country? Residents of our country? Everyone in the world equally? We will examine different traditions of moral thought including skeptics, communitarians, cosmopolitans, and use these traditions as tools to make reasoned judgments about difficult moral problems in world politics. (Area V)

Public Policy 160AC Work, Justice and the Labor Movement (4) (Area III or IV)
This course provides a broad, inter-disciplinary overview of the U.S. labor movement in the fight for social and economic justice. It will introduce students to critiques of racial capitalism and the power dynamics inherent in paid work, while considering why and how workers form unions in response. One of the primary objectives of this course is to develop a theoretical and analytical understanding of contemporary workers’ experiences of work in the U.S. shaped by race, class, gender, sexuality, immigration status, language, religion, and other social constructs. There will be a special comparative focus on the role of structures and the space for agency and mobilization in the Latinx, Black and Asian American communities.

Rhetoric 167 Advanced Topics in Law and Rhetoric: The Law of Thinking (4) This course in advanced topics in law, philosophy, and rhetoric proceeds as a philosophical seminar, taking, each term, a different path of inquiry into the philosophy of law as it reveals itself in diverse ways and places. This term, we shall engage in thinking on law by way of inquiring into the law of thinking. (Area II)

Sociology 137AC Environmental Justice, Race, Class, Equity, & the Environment (formerly 128AC) (4) (cross-listed w/ESPM 163AC) Overview of the field of environmental justice, analyzing the implications of race, class, labor, and equity on environmental degradation and regulation. Environmental justice movements and struggles within poor and people of color communities in theU.S., including: African Americans, Latino Americans, and Native American Indians. Frameworks and methods for analyzing race, class, and labor. Cases of environmental injustice, community and government responses, and future strategies for achieving environmental and labor justice. (Area II or IV)

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